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IASPM Canada 2013 Conference Information

We are very excited about how the conference is developing, and we are looking forward to welcoming you to Hamilton on 23-26 May!

Funding

First, we submitted the SSHRC Connections grant on 27 February. Thank you to everyone for responding to our follow-up requests for additional information and justification language! The conference grant has changed a great deal this year. Assisted by Craig Jennex and several other grad students involved with the local arrangements committee, Susan Fast and Christina Baade worked very hard to navigate these changes and write the strongest grant possible. If we are funded, we will be able to do a great deal to offset travel and accommodation costs for paper, workshop, and film presenters.

Registration

Second, some information on registration: the registration deadline is 23 April. If you do not register by this date, your name will be removed from the program. Regular registration will be $150 and student registration will be free. Registration will be handled through IASPM-Canada’s Paypal account. To register go here. We also ask that all presenters be members of IASPM-Canada or another national IASPM chapter. To join IASPM-Canada or to renew your membership, please go here. If you are a member of another national chapter, please indicate your membership on the registration form, although we would invite you to consider joining IASPM-Canada as well.

Accommodations

Most of the conference presentations will take place at the Sheraton Hotel in downtown Hamilton, which is also walking distance from the off-site conference events, great restaurants, and James Street North, which is the hub of Hamilton’s arts community. We have a great conference rate at the Sheraton Hotel of $109 per night, which will be available until 22 April. To book your room at this rate, go here.

For information on getting to Hamilton, please go here.

Please find a preliminary conference program here. If there are any changes you would like to make to the title or abstract, please send them to the program chair Will Echard william_echard (at) carleton.ca. by 15 April.

We will have digital projectors and speakers available for conference presentations. (Please bring your own laptop.) If you have other audio/visual needs, please send them to Heather Kirby, kirbyhl (at) mcmaster.ca by April 15, and we will do our best to accommodate them.

We are very excited to welcome you to Hamilton!

Best wishes,

Christina, Susan, and Craig

cfp

CFP – IASPM Canada Conference 2012

Sounding the Nation? Diaspora, Indigeneity, and Multiculturalism
IASPM-Canada Annual Conference
Acadia University, Wolfville, Nova Scotia
June 14 – 17, 2012

PDF (in English)

What does a critical examination of diaspora offer to our understanding of popular music in the multicultural settler nation of Canada? Over the past twenty years, the term diaspora has proliferated as a way of making sense of how groups of people, defined through ethnicity, culture, religion, and homeland, have circulated and settled in a postcolonial and increasingly globalized world. Although the history of diaspora is shaped by violence and inequality, the concept has also permitted scholars to move beyond a static sense of a “homeland” or a “multicultural mosaic” and examine the complicated interstices, hybridities, and networks that link populations through travel, communication, memory—and music.

The site of this conference, at Acadia University, Nova Scotia, calls to mind many histories of diaspora, colonialism, and the challenging ways in which music, race, identity, and ethnicity can intertwine. Acadia University is near Grand Pré, one of the principal sites of the Great Expulsion and subsequent return of the Acadians, for whom popular music continues to play an integral role in negotiating identity, language, and ethnicity. The nearby town of Weymouth was an important destination for Black Loyalists in the eighteenth century, and its proximity to the Acadian village of Claire exemplifies the complex social history of Nova Scotia. Both historically and continuing to the present day, diasporic communities and the indigenous Mi’ Kmaq peoples all negotiate their sense of race, ethnicity, and identity in ways that are inseparable from each others’ belief systems. Diaspora also figures into the Nova Scotian Celtic identity myth, which is reinforced by provincial tourism campaigns and influences provincial support of local music. Finally, twentieth-century outmigration has led to a diaspora of sorts for Atlantic Canadians seeking work in Western provinces, who use music as a means of preserving their cultural ties.

The conference organizers invite proposals for individual presentations, panels, workshops or performances on a broad range of topics related to the theme of the conference, including, but not limited to, the following

  • diasporic popular music genres: bhangra, Bollywood, klezmer, etc.
  • hip-hop and other genres of the “Black Atlantic”
  • popular music and diasporic identities
  • popular music and indigeneity
  • popular music and nationalism/nationality
  • popular music and language, language rights, linguistic minorities, and linguistic assimilation
  • popular music, travel, and racialized/gendered identities
  • popular music and physical/virtual borders
  • popular music and racializing practice and discourse: “love and theft,” appropriation, borrowing, the “post-racial,” etc.
  • popular music and Canadian multicultural ideologies and policies
  • popular music analysis and diasporic musical styles
  • popular music and mobility

Proposals for single papers, workshops, performances or other forms of presentation may be submitted. Abstracts for individual papers, roundtables, and workshops should be no longer than 300 words; proposals for panels should include an abstract of no more than 300 words for the panel as a whole, as well as abstracts of no more than 300 words for each paper proposed for the panel. It is possible that the program committee may accept a panel but reject an individual paper on that panel.

Each abstract should include a short biography (100 words) of the author (or each author if there are more than one) including the institutional affiliation if applicable and email address of each author. Each abstract should also include five keywords identifying the subject of the paper.

Please submit your abstract in French or English, depending on the language in which the paper will be presented, by October 20, 2011 (for consideration for travel reimbursement) or November 20, 2011 (final deadline for all others) to iaspmca (at) mcmaster.ca

All proposals will be read blind and evaluated by the program committee.
The program committee consists of the following individuals:

Dr. Christina Baade, Associate Professor, Department of Communication Studies and Multimedia, McMaster University

Dr. Norma Coates, Associate Professor, Don Wright Faculty of Music and Faculty of Information and Media Studies, University of Western Ontario

Dr. Jeff Hennessy, Director, School of Music, Acadia University

Dr. Charity Marsh, Canada Research Chair in Interactive Media and Performance, University of Regina

Dr. Johanne Melancon, professeure agrégée, Département d’études françaises, Université Laurentienne

Eric Smialek, Ph.D. student, Schulich School of Music, McGill University

Dr. Richard Sutherland, Assistant Professor, Department of Policy Studies, Mount Royal University

Dr. Jacqueline Warwick, Associate Professor, Music Department, Dalhousie University

Papers will be limited to a standard 20-minute length followed by 10 minutes of questions, whereas other presentations will be limited to 60 minutes. All participants must be members of IASPM-Canada. Membership information is available on the following website: http://iaspm.ca/membership/

For questions about the conference, contact program chair, Christina Baade (baadec (at) mcmaster.ca), or local arrangements chair, Jeff Hennessy (jeff.hennessy (at) acadiau.ca).

Submission deadlines:

October 20, 2011 (for consideration for travel reimbursement)
November 20, 2011 (final deadline for all others)
Applicants will be notified of the program committee’s final decisions by January 9, 2012.

______________________________________________________________________

Les sons de la nation? Diaspora, indigénéité et multiculturalisme
Conférence annuelle de la branche canadienne de l’IASPM
Université Acadia, Wolfville, Nouvelle-Écosse
14-17 juin 2012

PDF (en Français)

Comment un examen critique de la diaspora contribue-t-il à notre compréhension de la musique populaire au Canada, une nation multiculturelle bâtie par des colonisateurs venus de partout? Au cours des vingt dernières années, le terme «diaspora» a souvent été mobilisé concernant des groupes de personnes, définis par l’ethnicité, la culture, la religion et la patrie d’origine. Le concept traite de comment ces groupes ont circulé et se sont installés dans un monde postcolonial et de plus en plus mondialisé. Même si l’histoire de la diaspora est façonnée par la violence et l’inégalité, le concept a aussi permis aux chercheurs de dépasser les frontières statiques d’une «mère-patrie» ou d’une «mosaïque multiculturelle» et examine les interstices complexes, les hybridités et les réseaux liant les populations à travers les voyages, les communications, les mémoires – et la musique.

Le site du colloque, l’Université Acadia en Nouvelle-Écosse, rappelle les histoires multiples de diaspora, de colonialisme et les manières stimulantes dont la musique tresse les notions de race, d’identité et d’ethnicité. L’Université Acadia est située proche de Grand Pré, l’un des principaux sites du Grand Dérangement et du retour subséquent des Acadiens, pour qui la musique populaire continue de jouer un rôle profond dans la négociation de l’identité, du langage et de l’ethnicité. Weymouth, ville voisine, a été une destination importante pour les Loyalistes noirs au XVIIIe siècle et sa proximité au village acadien Claire illustre l’histoire sociale complexe de la Nouvelle-Écosse. Historiquement, et ce jusqu’à aujourd’hui, les communautés diasporiques et les peuples autochtones Mi’Kmaq négocient tous leur sens racial, ethnique et identitaire inséparablement des systèmes de croyances des uns et des autres. La diaspora s’immisce également dans le mythe de l’identité celtique néo-écossaise, qui est renforcé par les campagnes publicitaires promouvant le tourisme provincial et qui influence également le soutien provincial à la musique locale. Enfin, l’émigration du XXe siècle a mené à une sorte de diaspora des Canadiens de l’Atlantique, cherchant du travail dans les provinces de l’Ouest, et qui utilisent la musique comme moyen de préserver leurs liens culturels.

Les organisateurs du colloque vous invitent à soumettre vos résumés pour des communications individuelles, des panels, des ateliers ou des performances à propos d’un large éventail de sujets reliés au thème du colloque, incluant, mais ne se limitant pas à :

  • Les genres diasporiques de musique populaire : bhangra, Bollywood, klezmer, etc.
  • Hip-hop et autres genres de «l’Atlantique noir»
  • Musique populaire et identités diasporiques
  • Musique populaire et indigénéité
  • Musique populaire et nationalisme/nationalité
  • Musique populaire et langue, droits linguistiques, minorités linguistiques et assimilation linguistique
  • Musique populaire, voyages et identités de race/de genre
  • Musique populaire et frontières physiques/virtuelles
  • Musique populaire, pratiques racialisantes et discours : «amour et vol», appropriation, emprunt, le «post-racial», etc.
  • Musique populaire et politiques et idéologies multiculturelles canadiennes
  • Analyse de musique populaire et les styles musicaux diasporiques
  • Musique populaire et mobilité

Les propositions pour les communications individuelles, les ateliers, les performances ou les autres formes de présentation peuvent être soumises. Les résumés pour les communications individuelles, les tables-rondes et les ateliers ne doivent pas dépasser 300 mots; les propositions de panels doivent inclure un résumé ne dépassant pas 300 mots pour le panel en entier, ainsi que des résumés ne dépassant pas 300 mots pour chacune des présentations individuelles du panel. Le comité de programmation se réserve le droit d’accepter un panel mais de refuser une communication proposée pour ce panel.

Tous les résumés doivent inclure une courte biographie (100 mots) de chaque auteur/e, incluant l’affiliation institutionnelle, si applicable, et l’adresse de courriel de chaque auteur/e. Chaque résumé doit également inclure cinq mots-clés identifiant l’objet de la présentation.

Les propositions de communication doivent être soumises en français ou en anglais, dépendant de la langue choisie pour la communication, avant le 20 octobre 2011 (pour considération pour le remboursement des frais de déplacement) ou le 20 novembre 2011 (date limite pour tous les autres) à l’une ou l’autre des adresses de courriel suivantes : iaspmca (at) @mcmaster.ca

Toutes les propositions seront lues à l’aveugle et évaluées par le comité de programmation.

Les membres du comité de programmation sont :

Dr. Christina Baade, Associate Professor, Department of Communication Studies and Multimedia, McMaster University

Dr. Norma Coates, Associate Professor, Don Wright Faculty of Music and Faculty of Information and Media Studies, University of Western Ontario

Dr. Jeff Hennessy, Director, School of Music, Acadia University

Dr. Charity Marsh, Canada Research Chair in Interactive Media and Performance, University of Regina

Dr. Johanne Melançon, professeure agrégée, Département d’études françaises, Université Laurentienne

Eric Smialek, Ph.D. student, Schulich School of Music, McGill University

Dr. Richard Sutherland, Assistant Professor, Department of Policy Studies, Mount Royal University

Dr. Jacqueline Warwick, Associate Professor, Music Department, Dalhousie University

Les communications seront limitées aux 20 minutes habituelles, suivies de 10 minutes de questions et commentaires, alors que les autres présentations seront de 60 minutes. Tous les participants au colloque doivent être des membres en règle d’IASPM-Canada. Les informations relatives à l’inscription sont disponibles sur ce site Web: http://www.iaspm.c/membership/

Pour les questions au sujet du colloque, veuillez contacter la responsable du colloque, Christina Baade (baadec (at) mcmaster.ca), ou le responsable des arrangements locaux, Jeff Hennessy (jeff.hennessy (at) acadiau.ca).

Dates limites pour les soumissions :

20 octobre 2011 (pour être admissible à un remboursement des frais de déplacement)
20 novembre 2011 (date limite ultime)
Tous les postulants seront avertis de la décision du comité de programmation au maximum le 9 janvier 2012.

downtown-montreal

IASPM Canada Conference 2011 June 16 – 19, Montreal!

[English Below]

Musique et environnement: lieu, contexte et conjoncture
Conférence annuelle de la branche canadienne de l’IASPM
Schulich School of Music, Université McGill, Montréal
16 au 19 juin 2011

La musique tient lieu d’agent dans différents types de transformations environnementales, qu’elles soient sociales, économiques ou technologiques, et à l’inverse, les changements environnementaux peuvent être entendus dans les sons et les musiques d’aujourd’hui. On observe depuis peu dans le discours académique un tournant vers l’écologie du son, ce qui peut impliquer un plaidoyer politique en faveur de la préservation de la sonorité d’un environnement. Dans la même veine, l’environnement a été utilisé dans plusieurs formes artistiques tel que des sculptures et des installations sonores. Ce tournant a également pavé la voie à de nouveaux champs d’exploration en musique populaire marqués, notamment, par un intérêt particulier pour la notion de lieu (place).  Par exemple, nous pouvons penser aux manières dont des lieux spécifiques ont un impact sur les significations culturelles de la musique. De plus, les musiques populaires créent des étiquettes sonores telles que (le son de) « Liverpool » ou « Montréal » qui fonctionnent à la manière des genres musicaux. Mais que signifie l’attribution de telles étiquettes? Influencées par des facteurs comme la circulation des personnes, l’immigration et la proximité virtuelle que procure depuis peu l’Internet, les musiques populaires sont marquées du sceau de l’hybridité musicale et sociale par le biais de techniques telles que l’échantillonnage, la citation et l’imitation. L’enchevêtrement des éléments musicaux, sociaux et technologiques est à son tour affecté par l’environnement économique, façonné par les transformations des industries culturelles et de la crise financière globale qui sévit actuellement. Nos conceptions de l’espace et de l’environnement ne sont ni simples ni statiques et leurs relations à la musique sont riches et complexes.

Nous vous invitons à soumettre des propositions de présentations individuelles, de panels, d’ateliers ou de performances concernant un vaste éventail de sujets reliés au thème de la conférence, incluant sans s’y limiter :

* L’échantillonnage comme recyclage et recontextualisation;
* Musique et activisme environnemental;
* Le cycle de vie des technologies musicales;
* Le tournant vers les formes urbaines de composition musicale dans le domaine de l’acoustique écologique et des études en environnements sonores (soundscapes studies);
* Les enregistrements ethnographiques comme sources matérielles musicales;
* Les « experts » des différents milieux musicaux  (critiques, musiciens, journalistes, scientifiques, industriels, politiciens, etc.), leurs rôles, leurs interventions, leurs apports;
* La création d’ambiances et d’atmosphères dans/par la musique;
* Mettre en musique son environnement, chanter/composer son milieu (sounding the scape;
* Les alliances, les affinités et les réseaux permettant la constitution et le développement de différents milieux et environnements musicaux;
* Musique et paysage, architecture et design;
* Mouvement, mobilité et trajectoires d’acteurs, de produits, de groupes de catalogues, etc.;
* Musique, temps, durée et mémoire;
* Catastrophes naturelles et crises en chansons et musiques.

Les résumés pour les communications individuelles, les ateliers et les performances ne doivent pas dépasser 300 mots. Les propositions de panels doivent inclure un résumé ne dépassant pas 300 mots pour le panel en entier, ainsi que des résumés ne dépassant pas 300 mots pour chacune des présentations individuelles du panel. Le comité de programmation se réserve le droit d’accepter un panel mais de refuser une conférence proposée pour ce panel, ou encore d’accepter une présentation alors que le panel est refusé.

Tous les résumés doivent inclure une courte biographie (100 mots) de chaque auteur, auteure incluant l’affiliation institutionnelle et l’adresse de courriel. Chaque résumé doit également inclure cinq mots-clés identifiant l’objet de la présentation.

Les propositions de communication doivent être soumises en français ou anglais par courriel avant le 21 octobre 2010 (pour être considérées pour le remboursement des frais de déplacement) ou le 15 novembre 2010 à l’adresse suivante : IASPMMontreal@gmail.com.

Toutes les propositions seront lues à l’aveugle et évaluées par le comité de programmation.

Les membres du comité de programmation sont :

▪ Dr. David Brackett, Professeur, Musicology, Université McGill
▪ Dr. Owen Chapman, Professeur adjoint, Communication Studies, Université Concordia
▪ Dr. Line Grenier, Professeure agrégée, Départment de communication, Université de Montréal
▪ Mimi Haddon, doctorante, Popular Music Studies/ Musicology, McGill University
▪ Hélène Laurin, doctorante, Études en communication, Université McGill
▪ Dr. Martin Lussier, chercheur postdoctoral, Faculty of Information and Media Studies, University of Western Ontario
▪ Dr. Charity Marsh, CRC in Interactive Media and Performance, University of Regina
▪ Dr. Will Straw, Professeur, Department of Art History and Communications Studies, McGill University

Les conférences seront limitées aux 20 minutes habituelles, suivies de 10 minutes de questions et commentaires, alors que les autres présentations seront de 60 minutes. Tous les participants doivent être membres de l’IASPM-Canada. L’information pour joindre l’association est disponible sur le site Web suivant : www.iaspm.ca

Pour les questions au sujet du colloque, veuillez contacter le responsable du colloque, Will Straw, à william.straw(at)mcgill.ca

Dates limites pour les soumissions :

21 octobre 2010 (pour être admissible à un remboursement de voyagement)
15 novembre 2010 (date limite ultime)
Tous les postulants seront avertis de la décision du comité de programmation au maximum le 15 décembre 2010.

______________________________________________________________________
Music and Environment: Place, Context, Conjuncture
IASPM-Canada Annual Conference
Schulich School of Music, McGill University, Montreal
June 16-19 2011

Music functions as an agent for different types of environmental transformations whether they be social, economic or technological, with the reverse also being true: environmental changes can be heard in the music and sounds of our day.  In recent academic discourse we have observed a turn towards the ecology of sound, which can imply political advocacy of the preservation of an environment’s sonority.  In a parallel gesture, use has been made of the environment in many artistic forums, such as sound sculptures and installations.  This recent turn has opened up new areas of exploration for popular music as well, with the notion of place being of particular interest.  We may consider, for example, the way in which specific places have an impact on the cultural meaning of music. Furthermore, popular music creates labels such as the “Liverpool” or “Montreal” sound which function as genre-like distinctions. But what does it mean to attribute such a label?  Popular music also embraces musical and social hybridity via techniques such as sampling, quotation or imitation, influenced by factors such as travel, immigration and the recent virtual proximity of the Internet. The interrelationship of these musical, social, and technological elements is in turn affected by the economic environment, shaped by both changes in the cultural industries, such as the record industry meltdown, and the current global financial crisis.  Our understanding of space and environment is neither simple nor static, and the relationship of these to music is extensive and complex.

We invite suggestions for individual presentations, panels, workshops or performances on a broad range of topics related to the theme of the conference, including, but not limited to, the following:

* Sampling as recycling and recontextualisation;
* Music and environmental activism;
* The life-cycles of musical technologies
* The turn towards urban forms of musical composition within the domain of acoustic ecology and soundscape studies;
*  Ethnographic and “field” recordings as musical source material;
* “Expert” musical environments (critical, musical, journalistic, scientific, industrial, political, etc.), their roles, their interventions, their provisions;
* The creation of moods and of atmospheres in/by the music;
* Putting music in its environment, singing/composing its environment (sounding the scape);
* The alliances, affinities and networks allowing the constitution and development of different musical environments;
* Music and landscape, architecture and design;
* Movements, mobilities and trajectories of actors, of products, of groups, of catalogs, etc.;
* Music, time, duration, and memories;
* Natural catastrophes in songs and music

Abstracts for individual presentations, workshops, and performances must not surpass 300 words.  Abstracts for panels must include a summary of 300 words or less for the panel as a whole, as well as abstracts not surpassing 300 words for each of the incorporated presentations.  The programme committee reserves the right to accept a panel while refusing one of the proposed presentations or, on the other hand, to accept an individual presentation but to refuse the panel.

All abstracts must include a short biography (100 words or less) of the author(s), including institutional affiliation, and e-mail address.  Every submission must equally include five words keys identifying the subject of the paper.

Please submit your abstract in French or English, depending on the language in which the paper will be presented by October 21, 2010 (for consideration for travel reimbursement) or November 15, 2010 (final deadline for all others) to IASPMMontreal@gmail.com

All proposals will be read blind and evaluated by the program committee.

The program committee consists of the following individuals:

▪ Dr. David Brackett, Professor, Musicology, McGill University
▪ Dr. Owen Chapman, Assistant Professor, Communication Studies, Concordia University
▪ Dr. Line Grenier, Associate Professor, Communication Studies, University of Montreal
▪ Mimi Haddon, Ph.D. Candidate, Popular Music Studies/ Musicology, McGill University
▪ Hélène Laurin, Ph.D. Candidate, Communication Studies, McGill University
▪ Dr. Martin Lussier, Postdoctoral Fellow, Faculty of Information and Media Studies, University of Western Ontario
▪ Dr. Charity Marsh, Canada Research Chair in Interactive Media and Performance, University of Regina
▪ Dr. Will Straw, Professor, Department of Art History and Communications Studies, McGill University

Papers will be limited to a standard 20-minute length followed by 10 minutes of questions, whereas other presentations will be limited to 60 minutes. All participants must be members of IASPM-Canada. Membership information is available on the following website:
www.iaspm.ca
For questions about the conference, contact conference chair Will Straw, at william.straw(at)mcgill.ca

Submission deadlines:

October 21, 2010 (for consideration for travel reimbursement)
November 15, 2010 (final deadline for all others)
Applicants will be notified of the program committee’s final decisions by December 15, 2010.

regina_logo

Kelly Best Reflects on Spaces of Violence, Sites of Resistance

Kelly Best, a PhD candidate at Memorial University offers her reflections on the 2010 meeting of the IASPM Canada chapter at the University of Regina’s Interactive Media and Performance Labs.

From June 3rd to June 6th, scholars, artists, b-boys, and b-girls converged on the campus of the University of Regina (et environs) to share in the 2010 joint meeting of IASPM-Canada and the Canadian Society for Traditional Music (CSTM). Expertly organized and executed by Charity Marsh (CRC) and her hardworking crew of dedicated assistants from the Interactive Media (IMP) Labs at the University of Regina, the conference provided ample opportunity to discuss issues of music, meaning, and violence, to hear many performances, and to participate in hip-hop workshops. We also had opportunity to celebrate with Beverley Diamond at the official launch of her festschrift. While all of the activities and presentations I attended were enriching experiences, a few themes and events stood out.

Frequently discussed were the tensions between musical meaning, violence, artistic intention, and social impact. Thom Blake and his colleague from University of York, UK made this clear in their presentation on the ambivalent intentions of Terre Thaemlitz, a UK-based, experimental sonic artist who makes contradictory claims on the efficacy and intention of his musical exploration of the politics of transgendered bodies.

Incredibly gracious on both sides and as close to an intellectual battle as I have ever witnessed, was Martin Daughtry’s response to a portion of Susan Fast and Kip Pegley’s co-presentation on Judith Butler’s analysis and theorization of a group performance of a Latino-American reinterpretation of The Star Spangled Banner – an event that, according to Daughtry, did not occur. His critique raised important questions about the representation of “fact/truth” by postmodernists, like Butler, who theorize about music and violence.

Ellen Waterman’s paper on her research with assistive musical technology showed importance of improvisational play in the lives of the differently-abled and the subtle violence afflicted on them by making the assumption all creative expression be part of corrective “therapies.”

Keynote speaker Jocelyne Guilbault’s insightful presentation on Soca music in Trinidad gave compelling examples of how music can both resist and reinforce violence within diverse communities.

I also had the opportunity to participate in the expertly facilitated DJ workshop held in the Interactive Media and Performance Labs.  The only facility of its kind in North America, the lab was filled with sets of industry-standard turntables, laptops, mixers, and headphones.  DJ Hippo showed us how to drop a beat.

Drop a beat we did (or tried to do, in my case).  But skip a beat they did not. The Saturday night party held in Charity Marsh’s beautiful backyard was the brilliant grand finale to three evenings worth of deeply moving performances (including a surprise appearance by Regina’s finest). And did I mention the food? Like the delectables we delegates daily enjoyed, this conference was fresh, local, and ample. And all was implemented with unprecedented grace and generosity. The 2010 IASPM-Canada/CSTM meeting in Regina has been the highlight of my year. I offer sincere thanks to all those involved.

Kelly Best

PhD (Cand.)

Memorial University